Dear Bronxites. Say goodbye to many of your favorite organizations, likely to be shut down in the next few rounds of fundraising, most of which support the youth, the arts, and those who are destitute.

The lengths of dubiousness which the GOP has gone into getting this bill passed makes it clear; Congress is gambling with the lives of millions of people who rely on charitable and government social services by increasing the deficit to fund tax cuts.

The elimination of the charitable deduction for 31 million middle and upper-middle income taxpayers causes such damage to the not for profit sector; it will have no choice but to oppose the bill.

Because the bill increases the standard deduction, fewer people would take the itemized deduction for charitable contributions which would lead to a decline in charitable giving.
Charities had pushed for people to be able to deduct their donations regardless of whether they itemize. While some GOP lawmakers took up their cause, a universal charitable deduction was not included in the bill.
When Trump ran on DRAINING THE SWAMP, did you know he was talking about us????


In October BLOX NYC kick-started the Rocking The Bridge initiative which brought together business owners, community leaders, and residents for a massive overdue cleanup of the Third Ave Bridge in The Bronx. The event was followed by a block party to celebrate everyone’s efforts. Blox is at it again, this time they are getting into the holiday spirit.

Starting in December the popular Bronx neighborhood of Mott Haven will be the site of the Regalos NYC Holiday Market. The first ever festive shopping experience will give shoppers the opportunity to purchase all sorts of goods from over two dozen vendors. Retail from local and global brands, foods, and drinks from local breweries and distilleries will be available for purchase. Still, about a month away more details will come out soon.

This festive celebration of the community is all about showing off how far the South Bronx has come. It is essential to recognize the people and businesses that continue to shed the negative stigma of the South Bronx. Mott Haven is the starting point of this movement.



I love this show. I love everything about it. Well, except for the painfully beautiful Logan Browning aka DWP's weakest link.

The show' creator, the amazing, Justin Simien has created what most filmmakers and show runners only dream of; A perfect multi-perspective piece that includes the only thing that matters in any incident worth writing about - the complete and absolute personal view of each participant. Which is tough, trust me.

The entire season one is crafted in a way that it keeps telling the same story - the black face party - but every time from another character's point of view, and while considering the essence of what makes us do things as human, love, hate, sadness, pressure, pain. The script is just so damn smart and thoughtful, and funny and emotional, and yes, I am jealous.

The acting is pretty fucking fantastic as well! We are talking about a lineup that will make ANY PRIME TIME show, or mega film proud: Brandon P Bell Antoinette RobertsonDeRon HortonJohn Patrick Amedori, Jemar Michael and my favorite -Marque Richardson - all do an amazing job, and I can't wait for their Hollywood take over. 


One other nugget is the fact that Tina Mabry (one of my favorite young directors) and Barry Jenkins (oh, you know, Barry Jenkins) have director credit on a few episode and both leave their distinct footprint though respectful to the piece.

So, what's my problem? Relax. Logan Browning isn't on par with the cast, script or the directors. Sorry, but she isn't. And it's not that I am comparing her to the incomparable Tessa Thompson because I don't. I just didn't believe her acting most of the time. I still binged the show in 2 seating though. The show's creators and Netflix are working on season 2 as we speak, and if they decide to leave Logan as Sam, I hope they'll consider getting her some nonacting lessons.




parisWith the assistance of Bronx Tour Guide Alexandra Maruri, International photographer Matteo Pellegrinuzzi visited The Bronx this week and held a three-day exhibit at The Bronx Draft House. The Bronx/La Villette is a series of photos comparing two places with historical significance, The Bronx New York, and his neighborhood La Villette, Paris. In attendance were some notable personalities such as film director Sara Grimaldi, actor Holt McCallany, and photographer Robert Whitman.

With internationally acclaimed photographers holding exhibits in The Bronx, the expansion of The Bronx Museum, street artists getting national attention, and the increase in tourism, it is evident that The Bronx is shedding the negative stigma and our best days are ahead. Alexandra tells me, "From negative media attention and a lack of information there is a misconception about The Bronx. It is viewed as this dangerous place. This exhibit aimed to highlight the diversity of The Bronx and show everyday people from a local's perspective." Alexandra introduced me to Matteo who was kind enough to speak with me about his experience in The Bronx and more.



parisHow did The Bronx/La Villette exhibit come about? I met Alexandra Maruri 2 years ago. She appreciated my work, and she told me about her tourism business. She asked if she could show me around The Bronx to meet the locals and take portraits of them. I shot them with a film camera and developed them four months later. When I showed the results to the director of The Public Library of Paris, he proposed I expose the portraits during the “Paris-New York” month and suggested I make a comparison with La Villette, the neighborhood where I live.

You visited The Bronx before, but what are your impressions of what you’ve seen and who you have met thus far? I’ve been here once before when I met Alex, when I was on my own I just walked around and visited the borough.


What are the similarities between The Bronx and La Villette?  La Villette is part of the 19th district. 20 years ago the neighborhood was the center of a crack epidemic, and because of this, there was a continuing conflict with urban gangs. Houses weren’t easily rented or sold because of these problems. Just like the South Bronx, the neighborhood was seen to strangers as a “No Go Zone.” FOX News depicted the neighborhood this way after the attack on Charlie Hebdo. Several years before the terrorists lived in the neighborhood. In reality, it is very fashionable, more and more Parisians go out at night, and new bars most of them organic, keep opening. The local City Hall has made a policy of aperture to improve the image of La Villette ultimately. The idea is to improve the quality of life for Parisians and attract more tourists. Many events are held there including the Parisian Summer beach which attracts Parisians from throughout the city.


parisHow can a city draw recognition for its art culture? Would you encourage local artists to try and attract people from outside their important city to come and visit?  I think a city can be recognized from its architecture which is an art form. The South Bronx is a street artist neighborhood. I met Sin Xero and Sexer for instance. Their artwork has definitely changed the decoration of the district. In Paris, such artists as Dacruz, Marko 93, and Art of Popof spread their art on several walls in La Villette, and on the wall of the old rail road on Rue de L’Ourcq which is starting to become a destination for Parisians and tourists. Art buildings such as the 104 and activities organized by the public libraries attract people from the outside and help the development of the district.



parisWhen you return home, and someone asks “What is The Bronx like?” What would you tell them? In Europe people used to say “I’m going to The Bronx” when they were going to a messy or dangerous zone. When I talk to people about my travels in NYC, it's hard to change their mind and prejudice. But I describe The Bronx as an attractive part of the city that deserves a visit and which is not as dangerous as they think.

What is your next exhibit? I will make an interactive exhibit at the public library of the 19th district in November through December. It will be a wet plate collodion series; I will realize the portraits with the support of the inhabitants who will learn this technique of photography, created in 1850.



About Matteo Pellegrinuzzi: Mr. Pellegrinuzzi studied History of Cinema at the University of Pavia in Italy. He has made contributions as a cameraman and cinematographer since 2005. His work has been published in numerous international newspapers and magazines. Follow him on Instagram @pelligrinuzzi

About Alexandra Maruri: Ms. Maruri has been a Bronx tour guide and small business owner since 2011. Growing up and living near historic landmarks such as Yankee Stadium, Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, and Woodlawn Cemetery shaped her interest in Bronx history. She hopes her tours help improve the borough's image. You can follow Ms. Maruri on Instagram @bronxtours



Marc Maron is a funny guy. His style of uber realistic and dark comedy has been the perfect tone for a generation that has had enough but is, even more, fitting during Trump's America.

The opening bit talks about the day to day news blasts coming from the white house will have you nodding in sad agreement while you'll try laughing. He moves into the 'I am at the age where I only do what I want because I am about to die any minute' and set the grounds to 'remember the time when you realized your dad is an idiot?" and don't even get me started about the -I am over art...

The special is all that you can expect from Maron, a top comedian that is reminiscing the great Carlin with his wittiness and sense of timing. His best trait is the fact that you do believe he is suffering and just waiting to expire while writing his self-observational lazy bits.

I am not sure if I laughed or was just nodding in agreement throughout the Rolling Stones and the hat buying bits.

Watch the trailer here and then watch the full show on Netflix.  Oh,  and twitter that Mofo and give him love.




"We want to be the compass that helps men of color navigate those journeys.” Jason Rosario stated in an interview with this past June. He was explaining  the impact  a lack of authenticity and vulnerability in a digital landscape had had on men of color and how he's like to counteract it. It's a perfect sentence to summarize the intention of The Lives of Men, an integrated media + lifestyle website, founded by Jason, this past January. Their intention is to focus on chronicling positive and diverse stories of men in color.

The Lives of Men

As the oldest of 5 children, raised by a single mother in the Bronx, Jason has always been a leader and he's now utilizing those skills to help lead the next generation of young men. He hopes the website can serve inspiration and instruction while providing tools not afforded to him while growing up. The website's name symbolizes the complexity of being a back man in America in 2017.  Jason stresses the importance of featuring stories as diverse as the variety of experiences of all men of color and the importance of men being self-aware and in tune with their emotions in an environment that is inclusive to women and the LGBTQ community.





The Lives of MenSo what's on the mind of a black man who has dedicated himself to improving the perception of men of color in a racially tense America in 2017? We asked him. His response: Jay-Z's "4:44" and letting go "because at the end of the day, shit is not that serious."


Check out The Lives of Men and follow them on Instagram and Facebook.



DrafthouseWhat are the two things that The Bronx & Paris have in common? Being notoriously known for a variety of exceptional foods and inspiring art. This Wednesday, the worlds will collide at The Bronx Drafthouse, a local bar/restaurant located up the block from Yankee Stadium, known for its craft beer, burgers, and delicious sides. The drafthouse will be hosting a meet and greet with the international photographer, Matteo Pellegrinuzzi and feature his "The Bronx/ La Villette" exhibit.




MatteoMatteo is a Paris-based still photographer whose work has been featured throughout France and Italy, alike. In his newest exhibit, he created a series of photos featuring local people from both The Bronx and La Vilette in Paris. The images give a glimpse into the contrast of cultures, traditions, and histories of the world-renowned locations.

The exhibit opens on Wednesday, September 6th, at 5 pm and will offer a unique menu that represents both of the photographed locations:

The Bronx: Bronx Burger & French Fries + Bronx Based Draft Beer $14.95 pp + Tax

Paris: Croque Monsieur & French Fries + Bronx Based Draft Beer $14.95 pp + Tax


Stop by The Bronx Drafthouse for an evening of art, food, beer and cultural fusion.

The Bronx Draft HouseMatteo Pellagrinuzzi


The Bronx Art Space is a Non-for-Profit that promotes the innovative ideas of underrepresented and emerging artists and curators. It is dedicated to exhibiting quality artwork from The Bronx and around the world with a mission to foster dialogue around global issues.



A three-venue exhibition between Andrew Freedman Home, BronxArtSpace and Swing Space, STATE PROPERTY is a multi-disciplinary examination of American consumption of prison labor and our daily choices to purchase, condone or reject goods created in penitentiaries. The exhibition asks guests to consider what “Made in the U.S.A” currently means about the incarceration system and corporate outsourcing. Currency and choice are the springboards towards a much deeper dialogue that recognizes these injustices.


Opening Receptions

Sep 8, 6-9pm at BronxArtSpace

Sep 15, 6-8 at Swing Space

Sep 22, 6-11pm at The Andrew Freedman Home


STATE PROPERTY describes a citizen that once incarcerated is inspected, cataloged, housed, and assigned to the state as its property like a slave whose body if damaged or altered from its original value is further financially penalized.

STATE PROPERTY also describes all goods manufactured in correctional facilities and government land and buildings from courthouses to public housing, in which many of these products from furniture to mops are then used.

When major corporations can buy into this labor system as a way of appealing to the “locally owned, locally grown” fad, the prison industrial complex pins inmates into either forced labor as a means to pay back the cost of their incarceration or solitary confinement as punishment. Prisoners provide luxury and everyday items that they cannot partake in, while taxpayers provide for the upkeep of prisons. As incarceration rates grow exponentially, taxpayer money is transferred from poor minority communities to white rural counties to reject these drastic shifts in population.

The boundaries that are challenged between product, services, and citizenry are intentionally blurred by the artists forcing us to question how we define ourselves and personal ethics within our social system.

Touching upon a narrative that categorizes people of color as property, STATE PROPERTY comments on power paradigms that perpetuate today’s socioeconomic tiers, and simultaneously presents a

visual alternative that is more hopeful. Through painting, photography, sculpture, installation, video, and performance, artists scrutinize mass incarceration, police brutality, class conflict, and racial hierarchy.


More from BAS


Zaro's Family Bakery. Photo: Zaro's

The Bronx was smiling yesterday morning as news broke out about the world-famous Bakery's return to The Bronx. Their new location will open at 1309 Metropolitan Oval, one store front down from their previous location which is now a Boston Market.

But the news doesn't stop with Zaro's Family Bakery's October surprise for the Bronx. They also announced an expansion of their Port Morris headquarters which will include a retail section. Beginning in the fall of 2018 customers will be able to buy pastries directly from the headquarters in a separate section dedicated to the public. Plans haven't been finalized, so whether or not it will be a full-service bakery remains to be seen. The entrance to their retail section will be along Bruckner Boulevard and open during normal business hours.

The headquarters is a popular site in the neighborhood. You can catch tourists taking pictures in front of the 1 story building's multi colored pattern. In 2014 the Zaros recruited Brooklyn artist R. Nick Kuszyk to decorate the building. It took less than a week and 200 cans of spray paint to complete the mural. Adding a retail section will only enhance its popularity and continue to solidify Port Morris as a major destination in the South Bronx. It is already home to popular local businesses Milk Burger, The Bronx Brewery Port Morris Distillery, the Gun Hill Tavern, and the Bronx Baking Company. In July The Bronx Pulse reported a new office building is currently under construction on 141st street. 


zaro's"We're excited to return to The Bronx to serve the community we love, " said Micheal Zaro. The Bronx is thrilled to have you back. Zaro's Family Bakery is located at 138 Bruckner Blvd. You can follow them at twitter @ZarosBakery and on Instagram @zarosfamilybakery



This summer local artist Ronny Quevedo is sharing his studio at BronxArtSpace with 8 teenagers from the Bronx who are redesigning the awning of nearby Oaxaca-Mexican restaurant, La Morada.

While owner Natalia Mendez and son Marco Saavedra review their drafts as they would any design firm’s, they have also agreed to host any programs the students develop that investigate alternatives to gentrification.

(Ronny Quevedo Siembro Una Rosa Blanca Pa’ Ti 2010. Part of a series of screenprints inspired by bodegas as

cultural sites to express identity and social concerns.)

In fact, that was among the reasons why artist Ronny Quevedo reached out to La Morada to participate in the third iteration of his project Higher Sails. Quevedo, who grew up in the Bronx, originally conceived this project while on residency at Project Row Houses in Houston, Texas. His aim was to amplify the resources already in the community by teaching local youth design skills they can use to raise their voice and contribute to their community–—a goal Quevedo knew La Morada would champion.

Thanks to A Blade of Grass, which is funding the 12-week project, Quevedo was able to bring the project back to his own community in the Bronx.

All are welcome to see the preliminary design for La Morada’s awning as well as other new works by Ronny Quevedo and his fellow residents, Erica Bailey, Melissa Calderón, Cheyenne Julien, Joiri Minaya, and Alexis White at Open Studios on August 26, 5-9pm at BronxArtSpace and the Bruckner Building.


For more information, please visit


Street Workout Street workout, what is it all about? At the beginning of the 21st century, classic exercises were modified and combined with elements from other sports. The starting point of the whole was New York. Through the sports parks there, people could do their work out without fitness studios. Sport or work out parks consists mostly of different pull-up bars, bars, and hammocks so that mainly with the own body weight is trained.

Different groups developed their own style by combining the classical calisthenics with exercises from the gymnastics, break dance, hip  and free running, or to develop new movements themselves. These groups presented videos of the novel form of Calisthenics on the Internet and thus triggered a regular boom, especially in Eastern Europe.

Street Workout In 2011 the first World Championship for Calisthenics / Street Workout in Riga was held. Since then, a world championship has been held every year.

Among the best-known representatives of the modern Calisthenics are the groups Barentaz, Baristi, Barstarzz, Bar-Barians and Street Workout Ukraine and individuals such as Hannibal for King and Frank Medrano.

Street Workout Street workout is a physical activity performed mostly in outdoor parks or public facilities. It originated in Ancient Greece, but became a popular movement in Russia, Eastern Europe, and the United States, especially in New York City, Baltimore's urban neighborhoods and Myanmar.[citation needed] It has now spread all over the world. It is a combination of athleticscalisthenics, and sports.[1][unreliable source?] Street workout is a modern name for bodyweight workouts in outdoor parks. Street workout teams and organized competitions exist.